• 1966

    The late 1960s marked the most revolutionary time in our planet's culture, music, and fashion. This was the advent of the counterculture movement, psychedelic rock, and mini-skirts. The war in Vietnam raged and incited protests and riots. The Civil Rights Movement attracted a microscope to the American South and spurred introspection throughout the rest of the world. Mind-altering drugs and the dangers and exploration they offered became commonplace.

    On King's Road in London, a cultural revolution that reflected the anger and aspirations and excitement of a generation was being led by a bunch of kids. They were movers and shakers, the ones truly making decisions and affecting change and influencing youth the world over. John Lennon, Jimi Hendrix, and Mick Jagger were in their twenties. And one of the most influential British fashion icons - a guy running Dandie Fashions, the clothing boutique and playground for the beautiful people - was a guy named John Crittle. He was 23.

  • time_2_girl_leaning
  • time_3_transparent_girl
  • time_4_time_cover
  • Fashion

    Not surprisingly, as the world converged on London in the late 60s, a panoply of styles and looks perfectly blended in Chelsea and along King's Road. The Mods, foppishly dressed in ruffled, white-laced shirts peeking from beneath Edwardian jackets, strolled beside the Rockers, whose look was characterized by American denim and leather. And as the counterculture emerged, so did the counterculture dress, led by the Hippies who foraged for their clothing in secondhand shops. They pined for functional garments from remote areas: South American ponchos, Eskimo ear-warming caps, Afghan sheepskin jackets, and cheesecloth blouses from India. They embroidered their colorful, lavish clothing in Persian patterns. Beads, feathers and bandanas were everywhere.

  • David Bowie, pre-Ziggy Stardust,
    with bride Angie Barnett.
    time_5_couple_bw
  • A jacket designed by Dandie Fashions and worn by Jimi Hendrix.
    jimi hendrix's jacket
  • mini-skirt
  • The decade saw hemlines climbing higher and higher as women liberated themselves from the more matronly looks of the 1950s.
    time_8_2girls_bw
  • time_9_bentley_bw
  • And at 161 King's Road, John Crittle was designing silk frilled shirts, velvet suits in every possible color, and breasted jackets inside the doors of Dandie Fashions.

    And a car to match.

  • Music

    Amazingly, most of the rock icons we know today were just kids swaggering on the streets of London during this time. Lennon, McCartney, Jagger, Richards, Clapton, and Hendrix. They were kids making music that was bending the world. Many of them had cut their teeth scaling riffs by old Mississippi Delta blues masters. And by the late 60s, they had found their voices and their sounds. Like their folk singer-songwriter counterparts - who were infusing everyman struggles and allusions to worldwide conflicts into every lyric - these Chelsea and King's Road rockers were singing of rebellion and social protest.

  • Jimi Hendrix
    time_10_reading_book
  • John and Yoko recorded "No Bed for Beatle John" in November 1968 from Yoko's room at Queen Charlotte's Hospital in London where she was hospitalized during a critical juncture in her pregnancy. John took up residence on the floor beside her. The track consists of John and Yoko chanting from press clippings about themselves - an experiment in transforming the details of their life together into art. Yoko later miscarried, and the track appears on John and Yoko's album "Unfinished Music No. 2: Life with the Lions" along with "Two Minutes Silence," a tribute to the baby they lost.

  • Yoko's Lyrics
    "No bed for Beatle John. Beatle John Lennon lost his hospital bed yesterday to a patient. It happened at Queen Charlotte's Hospital, London, Where John was keeping vigil in the room Where his girlfriend, Yoko Ono, Is being kept under observation. When he realized his bed was needed for an urgent case John sent out for a sleeping bag. And last night He was once more happily kipped down alongside Yoko In the sleeping bag. Yoko who expects her baby next February Will remain in the hospital for another few days. A Beatles spokesman said There is a good chance for the baby's survival. The Beatles win battle of the nude LP! The Beatles have won their fight to put out an LP record With a sleeve showing John Lennon and Yoko Ono in the nude! EMI, the world's biggest recording company, Whose artists includes the Beatles, Refused to handle the LP called 'Two Virgins' Because of the sleeve. So did the group's American outlet, Capitol Records. But the record with its controversial sleeve Will be released in both countries next month. An official of The Beatles Apple company said last night The sleeve has not been censored or altered in any way. We are pleased it is being distributed But it may be that some record shops Will still refuse to handle it."
  • time_11_hospital
     
     
    Listen to an audio snippet of the hospital recording session.
  • John's Lyrics
    "bentley -- but no beatles beatle john lennon's psychedelic bentley purred into old windsor on thursday last week. resplendent with gold, green, red and blue patterns, and bearing the famous "apple" registration mark -- 222 apl -- the car was parked outside crevald's services ltd., the marine engineering firm, in straight road, but the car was not being driven by lennon. it was sold six weeks ago by dandie fashions, widgmore street, to 34-year-old leo nutley, a marine engineer from hampton surverying the exotic 1956 vehicle, he said: "It's foul, disgusting, horrible." he went further: "I don't like it." Mr. nutley said he intended respraying the car, but he had been told that it was worth more left as it is. and because of its value, mr. nutley is hoping to sell it in america. till then he will just use it as a business car, and go around telling people: "It's foul, disgusting, horrible." miss ono, 34, is named in a forthcoming defended divorce suit being brought by lennon's wife, cynthia."
  • time_12_jimi_hendrix
  • time_13_thewho_poster
  • And like their experimental, American contemporaries - bands such as Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead - they wove surreal, colorful and sexual imagery and repetitive beats into their songs, inspired by the use of psychedelic drugs. This was the heyday of the rock concept album, every song on the record unified by a theme and threaded by a narrative. The most famous of those was The Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, a set performed by a fictional band upon its 20th anniversary reunion.

  • Bob Dylan
    time_14b_dylan
  • time_15_pink_floyd
  • Jim Morrison
    time_16b_morrison
    s
  • Youth culture ruled. Discotheques were packed with young men and women dancing with explosive, hedonistic, totally individual moves while surrounded by mirrors reflecting the good time they're having. The music of this time and place pushed every boundary. The world's tensions worked their ways into the verses and melodies. Those with ears were listening to London.
  • Culture

    In the spring of 1966, Mick Jagger told Time magazine, "Youth has become emancipated. And the girls have become as emancipated as the boys." The culture of the late 60s was actually a counterculture. The majority of the teens-to-twenties generation, especially in London, was striking out and shouting out against and protesting The Establishment. They wrestled the day's subjects: The controversies surrounding Vietnam. Strained race relations. Women's rights. The redefinition of sexual morality. Experimentation with psychedelic drugs. The environmental impact of industry.

  • time_17_yellow_red_glasses
  • time_18_onstage
  • time_19_kingsroadkids
  • That emancipation and attitude permeated the music, fashion, art, and politics of the time. And so, along places like King's Road in London, the youth were practicing their freedoms and spending their (and their family's) money supporting the counterculture music and styles and ideals. And designers like John Crittle, an artist in his own right, simultaneously satiated and guided the youth with his clothing. He freed them from their traditions and sparked their imaginations.
 
Fashion
Music
Culture
 
  • 1966

    The late 1960s marked the most revolutionary time in our planet's culture, music, and fashion. This was the advent of the counterculture movement, psychedelic rock, and mini-skirts. The war in Vietnam raged and incited protests and riots. The Civil Rights Movement attracted a microscope to the American South and spurred introspection throughout the rest of the world. Mind-altering drugs and the dangers and exploration they offered became commonplace.

    On King's Road in London, a cultural revolution that reflected the anger and aspirations and excitement of a generation was being led by a bunch of kids. They were movers and shakers, the ones truly making decisions and affecting change and influencing youth the world over. John Lennon, Jimi Hendrix, and Mick Jagger were in their twenties. And one of the most influential British fashion icons - a guy running Dandie Fashions, the clothing boutique and playground for the beautiful people - was a guy named John Crittle. He was 23.

  • time_2_girl_leaning
  • time_3_transparent_girl
  • time_4_time_cover
  • Fashion

    Not surprisingly, as the world converged on London in the late 60s, a panoply of styles and looks perfectly blended in Chelsea and along King's Road. The Mods, foppishly dressed in ruffled, white-laced shirts peeking from beneath Edwardian jackets, strolled beside the Rockers, whose look was characterized by American denim and leather. And as the counterculture emerged, so did the counterculture dress, led by the Hippies who foraged for their clothing in secondhand shops. They pined for functional garments from remote areas: South American ponchos, Eskimo ear-warming caps, Afghan sheepskin jackets, and cheesecloth blouses from India. They embroidered their colorful, lavish clothing in Persian patterns. Beads, feathers and bandanas were everywhere.

  • David Bowie, pre-Ziggy Stardust,
    with bride Angie Barnett.
    time_5_couple_bw
  • A jacket designed by Dandie Fashions and worn by Jimi Hendrix.
    jimi hendrix's jacket
  • mini-skirt
  • The decade saw hemlines climbing higher and higher as women liberated themselves from the more matronly looks of the 1950s.
    time_8_2girls_bw
  • time_9_bentley_bw
  • And at 161 King's Road, John Crittle was designing silk frilled shirts, velvet suits in every possible color, and breasted jackets inside the doors of Dandie Fashions.

    And a car to match.

  • Music

    Amazingly, most of the rock icons we know today were just kids swaggering on the streets of London during this time. Lennon, McCartney, Jagger, Richards, Clapton, and Hendrix. They were kids making music that was bending the world. Many of them had cut their teeth scaling riffs by old Mississippi Delta blues masters. And by the late 60s, they had found their voices and their sounds. Like their folk singer-songwriter counterparts - who were infusing everyman struggles and allusions to worldwide conflicts into every lyric - these Chelsea and King's Road rockers were singing of rebellion and social protest.

  • Jimi Hendrix
    time_10_reading_book
  • John and Yoko recorded "No Bed for Beatle John" in November 1968 from Yoko's room at Queen Charlotte's Hospital in London where she was hospitalized during a critical juncture in her pregnancy. John took up residence on the floor beside her. The track consists of John and Yoko chanting from press clippings about themselves - an experiment in transforming the details of their life together into art. Yoko later miscarried, and the track appears on John and Yoko's album "Unfinished Music No. 2: Life with the Lions" along with "Two Minutes Silence," a tribute to the baby they lost.

  • Yoko's Lyrics
    "No bed for Beatle John. Beatle John Lennon lost his hospital bed yesterday to a patient. It happened at Queen Charlotte's Hospital, London, Where John was keeping vigil in the room Where his girlfriend, Yoko Ono, Is being kept under observation. When he realized his bed was needed for an urgent case John sent out for a sleeping bag. And last night He was once more happily kipped down alongside Yoko In the sleeping bag. Yoko who expects her baby next February Will remain in the hospital for another few days. A Beatles spokesman said There is a good chance for the baby's survival. The Beatles win battle of the nude LP! The Beatles have won their fight to put out an LP record With a sleeve showing John Lennon and Yoko Ono in the nude! EMI, the world's biggest recording company, Whose artists includes the Beatles, Refused to handle the LP called 'Two Virgins' Because of the sleeve. So did the group's American outlet, Capitol Records. But the record with its controversial sleeve Will be released in both countries next month. An official of The Beatles Apple company said last night The sleeve has not been censored or altered in any way. We are pleased it is being distributed But it may be that some record shops Will still refuse to handle it."
  • time_11_hospital
     
     
    Listen to an audio snippet of the hospital recording session.
  • John's Lyrics
    "bentley -- but no beatles beatle john lennon's psychedelic bentley purred into old windsor on thursday last week. resplendent with gold, green, red and blue patterns, and bearing the famous "apple" registration mark -- 222 apl -- the car was parked outside crevald's services ltd., the marine engineering firm, in straight road, but the car was not being driven by lennon. it was sold six weeks ago by dandie fashions, widgmore street, to 34-year-old leo nutley, a marine engineer from hampton surverying the exotic 1956 vehicle, he said: "It's foul, disgusting, horrible." he went further: "I don't like it." Mr. nutley said he intended respraying the car, but he had been told that it was worth more left as it is. and because of its value, mr. nutley is hoping to sell it in america. till then he will just use it as a business car, and go around telling people: "It's foul, disgusting, horrible." miss ono, 34, is named in a forthcoming defended divorce suit being brought by lennon's wife, cynthia."
  • time_12_jimi_hendrix
  • time_13_thewho_poster
  • And like their experimental, American contemporaries - bands such as Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead - they wove surreal, colorful and sexual imagery and repetitive beats into their songs, inspired by the use of psychedelic drugs. This was the heyday of the rock concept album, every song on the record unified by a theme and threaded by a narrative. The most famous of those was The Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, a set performed by a fictional band upon its 20th anniversary reunion.

  • Bob Dylan
    time_14b_dylan
  • time_15_pink_floyd
  • Jim Morrison
    time_16b_morrison
    s
  • Youth culture ruled. Discotheques were packed with young men and women dancing with explosive, hedonistic, totally individual moves while surrounded by mirrors reflecting the good time they're having. The music of this time and place pushed every boundary. The world's tensions worked their ways into the verses and melodies. Those with ears were listening to London.
  • Culture

    In the spring of 1966, Mick Jagger told Time magazine, "Youth has become emancipated. And the girls have become as emancipated as the boys." The culture of the late 60s was actually a counterculture. The majority of the teens-to-twenties generation, especially in London, was striking out and shouting out against and protesting The Establishment. They wrestled the day's subjects: The controversies surrounding Vietnam. Strained race relations. Women's rights. The redefinition of sexual morality. Experimentation with psychedelic drugs. The environmental impact of industry.

  • time_17_yellow_red_glasses
  • time_18_onstage
  • time_19_kingsroadkids
  • That emancipation and attitude permeated the music, fashion, art, and politics of the time. And so, along places like King's Road in London, the youth were practicing their freedoms and spending their (and their family's) money supporting the counterculture music and styles and ideals. And designers like John Crittle, an artist in his own right, simultaneously satiated and guided the youth with his clothing. He freed them from their traditions and sparked their imaginations.